OSCAR SHORTS FILM REVIEW – The Silent Echo: A remote and barren village with the backdrop of the majestic Himalayas is the idyllic setting to have courage and live the dream 

To dream and to immerse oneself in that moment requires no money, no setting and definitely no hard work, it just needs the power of imagination, there are no boundaries no limits to how far and beyond you can go.

there are no boundaries no limits to how far and beyond you can go

The difference is converting that dream into reality, that is a ‘One small step and one Giant leap,’ that few take and those that do, one day achieve the dream.

Four young hearts have that courage and boldly take the ‘small step,’ the experience is bittersweet; however, they remain resolute and undeterred.

 Many viewers and I included having watched this short film are left in no doubt that the four youngsters will achieve their dream.

The universal message, have courage, remain steadfast and never lose focus has been successfully linked by director and writer Suman Sen to a remote and desolate village where a group of young boys calling themselves Silence, live.

The universal message, have courage, remain steadfast and never lose focus has been successfully linked by director and writer Suman Sen

The cinematography created by Xoaher Musavvir, is very refreshing, the panoramic lensing immerses the viewer into the barren location. I particularly liked the close filming of the boys in the city. The camera did not pan out, it solely focused on the boys at their height and at street level and never gave away the city location; this may sound bizarre however I thought the location was more like a rundown part of New York, but it wasn’t. That’s how good the cinematography was!

refreshing, the panoramic lensing immerses the viewer into the barren location. I particularly liked the close filming of the boys in the city.

Mayukh and Moinak, a composer duo based in India, have produced a song that is pleasant to listen to, the words send a strong message ‘moving on is a necessity filled with sorrow, but it has to be done.’

A review by Sonia McCloud

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s