Molly Manning Walker’s Good Thanks, You illustrates the mental torment victims endure in the aftermath of sexual assault

Starring Jasmine Jobson (Top Boy) and Michael Ward (Steve McQueen’s Small Axe)

In an age where sexual assault remains debated as a reprehensible crime and often used in jokes under the guise of dark humour, “Good Thanks, You?” illustrates mental torment victims endure in the aftermath of sexual assault. At just sixteen, Director Molly Manning Walker became one of the many victims of sexual assault. The film arose from her experience; determined to inspire others to feel comfortable speaking out about their attack. In her award-winning directional debut, Walker erases the thin line between victim shaming and victim silencing.

The healing process following a sexual assault is usually depicted as a hasty process reducing the impact of a film’s message. Walker doesn’t direct the film’s focus on Amy’s actions leading up to her attack, leaving little room for victim shaming or accusations. Instead, Walker paints a vivid picture of the lasting mental torment rape victims endure long after their assault. We fail to acknowledge the reach to which rape affects all aspects of a victim’s life. In under fifteen minutes, audiences observe Amy’s life crumble. Those she trusted for help criticized and almost punished her. Sadly, the interrogative like approach is an all too familiar phenomenon for rape survivors. Walker’s use of men and women participating in victim shaming defines the imposed isolation among victims. If the attack weren’t aforementioned, it would appear that Amy was the perpetrator of a horrendous crime.

The healing process following a sexual assault is usually depicted as a hasty process reducing the impact of a film’s message.

While physical scarring eventually heals, mental scars reside much longer, leaving victims to muster a newfound strength to repair their life. Walker used her haunting experience to create a beautiful and realistic film; serving as a voice for survivors to know that they are understood and have a community. “Good Thanks, You?”, reflects the apathetic practices in the modern-day in hopes of making victim shamers aware of their actions and willing commit to an empathetic approach.

While physical scarring eventually heals, mental scars reside much longer, leaving victims to muster a newfound strength to repair their life.

A graduate of NFTS, Walker, is a London based director and cinematographer who strives to make the film industry more inclusive from both sides of the lense. The “Good Thanks You?” production and post-production crew consisted of ninety per cent women. Officially selected or competing for selection in over twenty film festivals, “Good Thanks, You?”, doesn’t need to be action-packed to explain that a lack of support for victims results in feelings of loneliness and self-blaming.

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