Rémi Allier’s Little Hands “Allier’s storytelling conveys a deep understanding of human emotion and innocence”

Everyone makes mistakes; sometimes they happen in a lapse of judgment or even a split decision made in blind rage. There are few however who would be driven to such anger that they would take an innocent child, such is the story that unfolds in Little Hands.

Everyone makes mistakes; sometimes they happen in a lapse of judgment or even a split decision made in blind rage. There are few however who would be driven to such anger that they would take an innocent child, such is the story that unfolds in Little Hands.

Ripe with political context the short opens amidst chaos in a brick factory, which is shutting down. The manager is trying his best to fend off enraged employees whilst his two-year-old son Leo watches from the window of his office. Tensions are high and violence bubbles close to the surface, when one worker Bruno sees an opportunity for leverage; he grabs Leo and begins to run.

What Bruno could not have foreseen however, is how the disarming innocence of a child can make your problems feel so small, such is the touching sentiment conveyed by director Rémi Allier. The French director has been going from strength to strength with successful short films, most of which focus on young protagonists.

 

It’s no surprise then that the short is told through the eyes of Leo, this however does not soothe the inner emotional backlash that Allier ensures is inevitable. Shots are carefully crafted to tug on the heartstrings, both in the pining for Leo’s safety and also for Bruno, the disenfranchised worker.

Allier’s storytelling conveys a deep understanding of human emotion and innocence. Realist performances from Jan Hemmenecker (Bruno), Steve Driesen and Sadrine Blancke (Leo’s parents) ensure that the tension of the situation really hits home.

If you’re looking for an emotionally explosive short film then Little Hands should be first on your list. Ripe with tension, amazing performances and crafty filmmaking it’s easy to see why young director Rémi Allier is one to watch.

Ripe with political context the short opens amidst chaos in a brick factory, which is shutting down. The manager is trying his best to fend off enraged employees whilst his two-year-old son Leo watches from the window of his office. Tensions are high and violence bubbles close to the surface, when one worker Bruno sees an opportunity for leverage; he grabs Leo and begins to run.

What Bruno could not have foreseen however, is how the disarming innocence of a child can make your problems feel so small, such is the touching sentiment conveyed by director Rémi Allier. The French director has been going from strength to strength with successful short films, most of which focus on young protagonists.

It’s no surprise then that the short is told through the eyes of Leo, this however does not soothe the inner emotional backlash that Allier ensures is inevitable. Shots are carefully crafted to tug on the heartstrings, both in the pining for Leo’s safety and also for Bruno, the disenfranchised worker.

Allier’s storytelling conveys a deep understanding of human emotion and innocence. Realist performances from Jan Hemmenecker (Bruno), Steve Driesen and Sadrine Blancke (Leo’s parents) ensure that the tension of the situation really hits home.

If you’re looking for an emotionally explosive short film then Little Hands should be first on your list. Ripe with tension, amazing performances and crafty filmmaking it’s easy to see why young director Rémi Allier is one to watch.

Jessica Harman

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